Christopher Voss Quotes

  • Body language and tone of voice - not words - are our most powerful assessment tools.
  • The most dangerous negotiation is the one you don't know you're in.
  • Emotions aren't the obstacles to a successful negotiation; they are the means.
  • Salary negotiations shouldn't be limited to just salary. Salary pays your mortgage, but terms build your career.
  • Very few negotiations are begun and concluded in the same sitting. It's really rare. In fact, If you sit down and actually complete your negotiation in one sitting, you left stuff on the table.
  • Price doesn't make deals, and salary doesn't control your career.
  • I was on the SWAT team in the FBI, and I had always wanted to be in SWAT.
  • Salary negotiations are particularly important because people are testing you as both a co-worker and an ambassador. They really don't want you to be a pushover, and they don't want you to be a jerk.
  • 'No' is a dynamic that you've got to master before you can ever master 'yes.'
  • If your first objective in the negotiation, instead of making your argument, is to hear the other side out, that's the only way you can quiet the voice in the other guy's mind. But most people don't do that.
  • The 'that's right' breakthrough usually doesn't come at the beginning of a negotiation. It's invisible to the counterpart when it occurs, and they embrace what you've said. To them, it's a subtle epiphany.
  • Every job that you take, the term that you should always include is, 'How can I be involved in the strategic projects that are critical to the future of the company?' You ask that question. It's a great 'how' question.
  • In a job negotiation, the implementation of that deal is your success that also causes the company to succeed.
  • Negotiation is often described as the art of letting the other side have your way. You have to give the other side a chance to put stuff on the table voluntarily.
  • Successful negotiation is not about getting to 'yes'; it's about mastering 'no' and understanding what the path to an agreement is.
  • Once you understand what a messy, emotional, and destructive dynamic 'fairness' can be, you can see why 'fair' is a tremendously powerful word that you need to use with care.