David Chang Quotes

  • I lived across the street from Noodle Bar. I could barely stand it, because you're there all the time; you can't get away.
  • I think the basic thing that home cooks can learn how to do is just season properly... If the home cook realized how little salt they use compared to what's needed, it would make their food taste better.
  • I find that there are a lot of similarities between French and Japanese food. I think they're two countries that have really systemized their cuisine and codified it.
  • If you ask what people say what American cuisine is, they cannot really do it. I don't know what it is.
  • Life's too short to just breeze on by.
  • Fine dining teaches you how to cook many different things, and it gives you the basic fundamentals, but these specialty restaurants, they're not teaching you the broad foundation you need to become a well-rounded cook.
  • If people ask me, 'What do you think could improve in Toronto dining,' I'd say there's nothing to improve on.
  • I love chicken. I love chicken products: fried chicken, roasted chicken, chicken nuggets - whatever. And going to Japan, I would see that these chicken were smoked and then grilled and then have this amazing crispy skin.
  • I wanted to disprove the notion that you couldn't open a great restaurant in a casino.
  • I look forward to the spring vegetables because the season is so short. Mushrooms, edible foraged herbs, wild leeks, early season asparagus.
  • Yes, natural is good and healthy, and whole foods are important. However, experimentation is important, too.
  • Food, to me, is always about cooking and eating with those you love and care for.
  • I learned so much more prepping vegetables than I ever did in cooking school.
  • America is a country of abundance, but our food culture is sad - based on huge portions and fast food. Let's stop with the excuses and start creating something better.
  • I really don't care for the proper chef coat.
  • There's the common misconception that restaurants make a lot of money. It's not true. If you look at maybe the top chef in the world, or at least monetarily, it's like Wolfgang Puck, but he makes as much money as an average crappy investment banker.
  • People are getting famous now for serving food out of a truck, or for, well, pork buns. I don't know if I'm really pleased to be a part of that. I'm somewhat terrified of what the future holds, especially in America.
  • Cooking and gardening involve so many disciplines: math, chemistry, reading, history.
  • People are trying to figure out what American food is; it's certainly an amalgamation.
  • The process and organization leading up to cooking the egg can tell you a lot about the cook.
  • The livelihood of the restaurant is dependent upon getting the word out.
  • I don't like eating in restaurants.
  • Be careful what you wish for - getting to be a successful business and maintaining it is so hard. Anyone can be good one night; being good over several years is incredibly difficult.
  • To eat well, I always disagree with critics who say that all restaurants should be fine dining. You can get a Michelin star if you serve the best hamburger in the world.
  • I'm not trying to bring New York to Toronto. I want to understand Toronto better.