Lynsey Addario Quotes

  • For a journalist who covers the Muslim world, we have responsibilities to be familiar with that culture and to know how to respond to that.
  • I think it's important to have perspective and to look at what you don't necessarily want to see.
  • I didn't know a single female photographer who covered conflict who even had a boyfriend, much less a husband or a baby.
  • I think that more often than not, people underestimate me.
  • I started freelancing for the Associated Press. I had a great mentor there who sort of taught me everything.
  • Sometimes when I am photographing a major news event, I am suddenly overwhelmed by helplessness.
  • I had imposed unspeakable worry on my husband, Paul de Bendern, on more occasions than I could count.
  • I think when I started going to war zones and started covering humanitarian issues, it became a calling because I realized I had a voice, and I can give people without a voice a voice... and now it is something that sits inside of me every day.
  • The fact is that trauma and risk taking hadn't become scarier over the years; it had become more normal.
  • I was kidnapped by Sunni insurgents near Fallujah, in Iraq, ambushed by the Taliban in the Korengal Valley in Afghanistan, and injured in a car accident that killed my driver while covering the Taliban occupation of the Swat Valley in Pakistan.
  • I always knew my death would be a possible consequence of the work I do. But for me it was a price I was willing to pay because this is what I believed in.
  • The Taliban rose to power in 1996, vowing stability and an end to the violence raging across the country between warring mujahedeen factions, and to implement rule by Sharia law, or strict Islamic rule.
  • I'm a very open person, very self-deprecating. I accept my flaws.
  • I had first visited Kurdistan in 2003 before the invasion of Iraq, camping out in Erbil and Sulaimaniya while waiting for Saddam Hussein's fall.
  • In a place like Afghanistan where the society is completely segregated, women have access to women. Men cannot always photograph women and cannot get the access that I get.
  • I grew up in Connecticut, going in and out of New York City, and I worked in the city in the '90s. I was freelancing for the Associated Press, and I fell in love with New York.
  • You have to believe 100 percent in what you're doing, that some picture or some thing we do is going to change the world in some tiny, minute way.
  • It seems like, yeah, of course - I always think my work is important, or I wouldn't risk my life for it.