On Quotes

  • When you're on the court, there is certain things that you would do that you wouldn't do off the court. When you get off, you obviously have to be gracious and a humble person. When you are on the floor, be a team player. Championships are what you are defined by - legacy. Go about things the right way.
  • You work on an idea, your first interpretation is very raw and you work it and you work it and it gets polished and polished. It gets to a certain level and then it comes down off that peak.
  • Working on the film really made me confront my opinions about change and gentrification.
  • When you're on tour, you're trying to get the crowd involved and really sing and perform to them. When you're going to write and be in the studio, it's like, 'Now I have to think about me.' That's the mind-set you have to work with.
  • Whether it's on top of a phone booth or a $200 million soundstage, it's about stories.
  • Working on a film is so great because you have the luxury of more time when you're on a movie than when you're on television.
  • Working on the franchise and getting direction from George Lucas - it's something that I never thought would take place.
  • Working on an adaptation is not as satisfying, because it's not your original work: you're interpreting. With 'L.A. Confidential,' I loved the book. In that case, I felt I was guardian of the work, staying as true to the novel as I could. I've since met the novelist, and he loves the movie and the script.
  • Women thrive on novelty and are easy meat for the commerce of fashion. Men prefer old pipes and torn jackets.
  • Work takes on new meaning when you feel you are pointed in the right direction. Otherwise, it's just a job, and life is too short for that.
  • You turn on the TV, and you see very bland interviews. Journalists in the United States are very cozy with power, very close to those in power.
  • When writing on black life, whites have often been unwelcome, usually called upon to give witness or hauled in as the accused.
  • Working on a soap opera is such good training for the novice actor. No rehearsal, 120 pages of dialogue per week, and one take to get the scene right. No room for error.
  • You heard on all sides that the brightest Jewish children were turned down if the examining officers did not like the turn of their noses.
  • Working on 'Dexter' is like shooting one big movie every year.
  • Working on a big-budget summer blockbuster with a built-in fan base is a dream come true for any actor.
  • You work on a play or movie, you have the whole script, so you're constructing a performance based on the bible that you have. In TV, you don't, so to actually invest in that and let that be the exciting part is terrifying and certainly leaves room for mistakes, looking back.
  • You're on earth. There's no cure for that.
  • When you're on tour you definitely don't want lots of arguments. It's very important that everybody gets on because you're in close proximity a great deal of the time.
  • When you're on set, you have to perform and look the part.
  • Working on the Samurai sword is very different because your body position has to be very still. It's a much quieter was of fighting.
  • When you're on a boat, you're going to little islands and stuff. It's not a partying kind of thing.
  • Years ago on my radio show, I used to say, 'I'm a conservative, but I'm not in a bad mood about it.' I've always believed that civility in heavy doses is essential in self-government.
  • Whenever I'm on tour and I'm in my hotel room and I'm writing and playing my guitar, I go in the bathroom and I record whatever I'm writing in there. It's just what I love to do.
  • Writing music on your own makes you think a lot about your life. Who are you? Would you change anything about yourself? This is where it comes from.
  • Who's on the case when it comes to the flat tax?
  • Working on 'Austin and Ally' has been an absolute dream! We literally have fun every single day! Whether it's scaring each other or singing together or just hanging out in each other's dressing rooms, the cast and I are super close! I feel really lucky to be with everyone on our set!
  • When you're on a submarine you're usually underwater for months at a time, and you don't get to Skype or make phone calls. When you get messages, they're maybe two sentences. They're very short.
  • While on top of Everest, I looked across the valley towards the great peak Makalu and mentally worked out a route about how it could be climbed. It showed me that even though I was standing on top of the world, it wasn't the end of everything. I was still looking beyond to other interesting challenges.
  • You are on a soulful path that asks you to step into the greatest version of yourself. It is a sacred gift to shine your brightest light, not just in your moments of glory, but each day.
  • With luck on your side, you can do without brains.
  • When you're on the road, you have to be louder and you have to communicate. That's really the bottom line.
  • Why on earth should I care whether people read me with their eyes or their ears?
  • Writing on assignment, with lots of money handed to you before you even began, got very scary for me. My dread of not being perfect, something I got from a childhood surrounded by powerful, successful people, began to infect everything I wrote.
  • Working on 'Newsroom' has given me an appreciation of the struggle that you go through on the 24-hour news cycle. The people who are legitimately attempting to deliver honest news are really facing a tough, uphill climb that's a lot harder than any other time in history.
  • Working on 'Laguna' was great because just being in production and shooting stuff and having to go back and relive some things, and there were some lines here and there that the producers would want us to say, and just kind of, you're forced to recreate moments, and just working on the show was so much fun.
  • Whether I'm on or off the field, I know the importance of getting enough sleep and starting the day with a wholesome breakfast like oatmeal made with milk and fruit.
  • When you're on an ensemble show and you're messing around with everybody every day and you're not in every scene, and then all of a sudden you're in every scene, it's rough.
  • Working on 'Fresh Off the Boat' has been really enlightening to me because it's made me actually think about the roles that Asians and Asian-American women have played in media. Not because I didn't think it was important before, but because before, I was really focused on just paying my rent.
  • Working on a startup is a balancing act: being crazy enough to believe your idea can take off but not crazy enough to miss the signs when it's clearly not going to.
  • You go on Facebook, you buy social advertising. And you can very cost-effectively target people who are in the market for your product from all over the world.
  • You rely on a lot of things about learning to play a particular character.
  • Working on 'Nightmare Before Christmas,' I had endless arguments, like the studio saying, 'You can't have a main character that's got no eyeballs!' 'How is anybody going to feel for somebody with just eyesockets?' You know? So, it's those kind of things that really wear you down.
  • Working alone on a poem, a poet is of all artists the most free. The poem can be written with a modicum of technology, and can be published, in most cases, quite cheaply.
  • Working on 'Good Luck Charlie' has been an awesome experience, and it's so crazy to build a fan base and have all those people tune into the show.
  • You put on the military outfit, and it definitely tightens everything up and makes you stand up straighter.
  • Work on good prose has three steps: a musical stage when it is composed, an architectonic one when it is built, and a textile one when it is woven.
  • You build on failure. You use it as a stepping stone. Close the door on the past. You don't try to forget the mistakes, but you don't dwell on it. You don't let it have any of your energy, or any of your time, or any of your space.